Ah, the Quirky World of Big-Time College Football Coaches

USA Today did a great FOI-driven sports story looking at the crazy stuff included in coaches’ contracts….

USA TODAY Sports reporters and editors analyzed thousands of documents in calculating salaries for the 124 FBS head coaches and nearly 1,000 assistants.

While combing through contract after contract – after contract after contract – we also came across a few interesting contractual “quirks.” Some involve relationships with supermarket chains, golf clubs and gun shops. Others are bonuses that can be earned by reaching certain on- and off-field goals. Here are a few examples:

Texas coach Mack Brown:

Brown was paid $60,000 to serve as the chairman of the board for the University of Texas Golf Club. While it’s a pittance compared to his football earnings, Brown’s off-the-field benefits also included a $750 gift card to McBride’s Guns in Austin.

And this gem:

Washington coach Steve Sarkisian:

The university pays the cost of having Sarkisian’s family travel to all away football games, all postseason events in which the football team participates and two additional business-related trips each fiscal year if he so elects.

Poor guy needs travel money….

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FOI AT Work in the Sports Department: Social Media Monitoring

Nice use of FOIA by USA Today:

Student athletes at the University of Kentucky and most at the University of Louisvillesurrender their online privacy to their coaches under a social media monitoring system used by both schools, as well as others across the country.

As a condition of participating in sports, the schools require athletes to agree to monitoring software being placed on their social media accounts. This software emails alerts to coaches whenever athletes use a word that could embarrass the student, the university or tarnish their images on services such as Twitter, Facebook, YouTube and MySpace.

The University of Louisville flags 406 words or slang expressions that have to do with drugs, sex, or alcohol. The University of Kentucky flags a similar number, of which 370 are sports agents’ names.

The words range from the seemingly innocuous “pony” — a euphemism for crack cocaine — and “panties,” to all manner of alcoholic drinks and sexual expressions usually heard on the street.

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FOI At Work: Federal Retirement Benefits

 

Retirement

Retirement (Photo credit: 401(K) 2012)

USA Today took a look a the Civil Service Retirement System database, obtained under a Freedom of Information Act request. The Office of Personnel Management withheld some information, including names, ages and length of service.

More than 21,000 retired federal workers receive lifetime government pensions of $100,000 or more per year, a USA TODAY/Gannett analysis finds.

Of these, nearly 2,000 have federal pensions that pay $125,000 or more annually, and 151 take home $150,000 or more. Six federal retirees get more than $200,000 a year.

Some 1.2 percent of federal retirees collect six-figure pensions. By comparison, 0.1 percent of military retirees collect as much.

The New York State and Local Retirement System pays 0.2 percent of its retirees pensions of $100,000 or more. The New Jersey retirement system pays 0.4 percent of retirees that much. Comparable private figures aren’t available.

The six-figure pensions spread across a broad swath of the federal workforce: doctors, budget analysts, accountants, public relations specialists and human resource managers. Most do not get Social Security benefits.

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